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Experiential Education: Community Based Experiential Learning & Critical Service Learning

A guide to resources on various topics in experiential education

Learn more about Community-Based Learning

Community-based learning and "critical service learning" take into account the impacts of the activity on the community and consider how to make change. Learn more about the factors to consider when planning an experience out in the community, different community-based learning modalities, and how Augsburg is connected to our neighbors on the Sabo Center for Democracy and Citizenship website.

Articles

Bocci, Melissa. (2015). “Service Learning and White Normativity: Racial Representation in Service-Learning’s Historical Narrative.” Michigan Journal of Community Service Learning: 5-17.

 

Bortolin, Kathleen. (2011). “Serving Ourselves: How the Discourse on Community Engagement Privileges the University over the Community.” Michigan Journal of Community Service Learning: 49-58.

 

Cooper, Jay R. (2014). “Ten Years in the Trenches: Faculty Perspectives on Sustaining Service-Learning.” Journal of Experiential Education 37 (4): 415-428.

Kajner, Tania, et al. (2013). “Critical Community Service Learning: Combining Critical Classroom Pedagogy with Activist Community Placements.” Michigan Journal of Community Service Learning: 36-48.

Mann, Jay A., et al. (2015). “Restrictive Citizenship: Civic-Oriented Service Opportunities for All Students.” Journal of Experiential Education 38 (1): 56-72.

 

Mitchell, Tania. (2008). “Traditional vs. Critical Service-Learning: Engaging the Literature to Differentiate Two Models.” Michigan Journal of Community Service Learning: 50-65.

 

Mitchell, Tania D.1. 2015. “Using a Critical Service-Learning Approach to Facilitate Civic Identity Development.” Theory Into Practice 54 (1): 20–28.